No. 522
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
May 14, 2021

Horatio Alger Story.

An inspiring author with an unsavory past.
January 22, 2013
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"The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan MandijnYes, it's time for yet another Link Dump.Let's get the show started!The murder of Alice Sterling.The Los Angeles alley that made film history.The theft of the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London.The last WWII German holdouts...were by the North Pole.Before the Wright brothers, there was Aerodrome No. 5.Murders that were allegedly carried out by a
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A few weeks ago, Ephemeral New York put together a post about the former Czech neighborhood once centered around 72nd Street between First and Second Avenues on the Upper East Side. The post generated many comments, with readers either reminiscing about a vanished enclave they remember well or wishing Manhattan still had pockets of ethnic […]
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Ephemeral New York - 5/9/2021

Along with Bertie Whitehead, Abby’s half-sister, May 13th was also the birthday of Helen Craig, famous stage actress best-remembered for Johnny Belinda. Helen Craig, who played Abby in The Legend of Lizzie Borden was born May 13, 1912, a month after Titanic sank. Helen Craig was not a great beauty by Hollywood standards, but a very fine actress. https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0185871/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1 Her portrayal of Abby Borden as a mean, greedy glutton, more than any other thing, has affected the way most people think of Abby Borden. Sadly it was not an accurate portrayal. Helen did some television in her later career, most notably The Waltons. She died in New York City in 1986. She was married to stage and film actor John Beal who played Dr. Bowen in Legend of Lizzie Borden. They are seen together in the publicity photo below.
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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 5/13/2021
Youth With Executioner by Nuremberg native Albrecht Dürer … although it’s dated to 1493, which was during a period of several years when Dürer worked abroad. November 13 [1617]. Burnt alive here a miller of Manberna, who however was lately engaged as a carrier of wine, because he and his brother, with the help of […]
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Executed Today - 11/13/2020
8-year-old Alice Sterling disappeared from the steps in front of her father’s Boston barbershop the afternoon of April 10, 1895. The three-day search for Alice ended at a shallow grave in the floor of a nearby barn. Angus Gilbert, a friend of the Sterling family especially fond of little Alice, lived in a room above the barn. Gilbert was charged with her
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Murder By Gaslight - 5/8/2021

LOOK OUT FOR "SOAPY" SMITHSt. Louis DispatchSeptember 23, 1897(Click image to enlarge) e reported himself in good health and money."   New information showing that Soapy Smith did go to St. Louis to check up on his ailing wife, Mary, after leaving Skagway.  Below is the transcription of the article from the St. Louis Dispatch, September 23, 1897. LOOK OUT FOR “SOAPY” SMITH ― The Smooth Man
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[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Horatio Alger Story.

Ragged Dick“Horatio Alger Story” has become a generic term for the rise from poverty to wealth through hard work and determination. Horatio Alger Jr. wrote more than a hundred books, in the late 1800s, about young boys gaining success through luck and pluck. Though Alger’s own story is hardly rags-to-riches, it is an all too familiar one—before achieving literary success he was a minister, defrocked for molesting young boys.

Horatio AlgerHoratio Alger Jr.

Horatio Alger Jr. was the son of a prominent Unitarian minister who hoped that his son would follow in his footsteps. In 1848, at age 16, the younger Horatio was admitted to Harvard College where he discovered he had a penchant for writing. After graduation he tried his hand at professional writing and though he had several poems and stories published in magazines, it brought in very little money. In 1857 he reluctantly enrolled at Harvard Divinity School.

Alger continued writing and had received some recognition (if little money) by the fall of 1864 when he became pastor of the First Unitarian Parish of Brewster, Massachusetts.  He was a vigorous and engaging speaker and was very active in church affairs. He was especially zealous in organizing and participating in boys’ activities such as sports, hiking and studying.  His reputation for being “always with the boys” was noted with disappointment by the single women of the parish who viewed Alger as an eligible bachelor, though he was short, balding and 32 years old.

Then rumors began to circulate regarding inappropriate behavior on the part of the pastor. One of the boys told his aunt that Reverend Alger had molested him.  Rumors of other “evil deeds” surfaced until church officials could no longer ignore the situation. At first they decided to just not rehire Alger the following year, then, with a prudence seldom seen today, they decided it was wrong to let him go to another pulpit, free to continue his bad behavior. The parish decided to form a committee to investigate further until they could either exonerate or indict Alger.

The committee confirmed the rumors and reported, “We learn from John Clark and Thomas S. Croaker that Horatio Alger Jr. has been practicing on them at different times deeds that are too revolting to relate.”  When they brought the charges privately to Alger, “he neither denied nor attempted to extenuate but received it with the apparent calm of an old offender.” The matter was reported to the Unitarian Association in Boston; Alger was removed from his position and he hastily left Massachusetts for New York.

Horatio Alger

Four years later, wracked with guilt over the incident, Alger discussed the matter with psychologist, William James, son of philosopher Henry James. The elder James remarked that, “Alger talks freely about his late insanity—which he in fact appears to enjoy as a subject of conversation.” But there is no evidence that he discussed this with anyone else.

Horatio Alger

Horatio Alger was able to keep his indiscretions secret, and became enormously successful writing books and stories about young boys overcoming adversity and achieving their dreams. Though there was a sameness to all the stories—or in Alger’s words they had a “family resemblance” – this did not seem to bother their young readers. The books were popular among boys for the rest or Alger’s lifetime and well into the twentieth century.

Alger continued to work with young boys, both directly and philanthropically, with a special interest in the Newsboy’s Lodging House in New York City, but there is no indication that he ever repeated his earlier indiscretions. In fact there is no evidence that he was anything but celibate for the rest of his life.


Sources:

  • Kohn, George C.. The new encyclopedia of American scandal. New York: Facts on File, 2001.
  • Scharnhorst, Gary, and Jack Bales. The lost life of Horatio Alger, Jr. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985.